Themed Curriculum Lesson grade 7
This lesson plan is part of a vertical curriculum centered around the theme of entertainment.

 

Unit:  Students will be reading the play form of Norton Juster's The Phantom Tollbooth by Susan Nanus.  Throughout the unit our focus will be elements of theater, reading comprehension, and appreciation of figurative language forms.  This lesson focuses on understanding idioms, a form of figurative language, for the purposes of greater comprehension and experiencing humor in a work of literature.

 

Lesson Title:  Being Entertained by Idioms

 

Grade:  7

 

Lesson Introduction:  Students have already learned the basic structure of a play.  They have also learned and practiced identifying author's purpose.  This lesson will deepen their understanding of author's purpose to entertain, using humor through idioms.

 

Core Curriculum Content Standards:  Language Arts 3.1

Cross Curriculum Connections: Visual & Performing Arts1.3

    Social Studies 6.3

    Technology 8.1

 

Objectives

  • The student will be able to identify the literary technique figurative language within context.
  • The student will be able to understand and appreciate the author's use of figurative language.
  • The student will be able to expand understanding of a literary work by correctly interpreting idioms and figurative language.

 

Materials

  • The Phantom Tollbooth script by Susan Nanus
  • Internet access
  • Handouts
  • Pencils
  • Overhead projector and transparency copies of charts
  • Task cards with directions for activities
  • You may find it helpful to have a copy of one of these books: GoEnglish.com Pocket English Idioms by Adam Sullivan and Rita Tseng.

Scholastic Dictionary of Idioms: More Than 600 Phrases, Sayings, and Expressions by Marvin Terban

 

Procedure:  Day One

 

Anticipatory Set:  Re-read several idioms from the play aloud to students.  Ask if any of them have heard these phrases in places others than the play.

 

Activity

1.      Follow up:  Define idiom or common expression, also referred to as figure of speech, as "colorful, familiar phrases whose meanings are popularly understood.  These expressions are not meant to be taken literally and generally do not make sense when they are." (Prentice Hall Literature Copper, 1994)

2.      Modeling:  Re-word or further explain this definition.  Explain using one of the examples from the play.  Have students tell its meaning literally, and then give its figurative or understood definition.  Record this information onto the chart (see hand out).

 

Check for Understanding

1.      Guided Practice:  Use the chart to continue this process for several other idioms in the play.  This may be done in groups, pairs, or independently.  Students may not know all of the figurative or understood definitions of these phrases.  If so, the following websites translate idioms:

http://home.t-online.de/home/toni.goeller/idiom_wm/

http://www.comenius.com/idioms/index.tpl

Or you may find it helpful to have a copy of one of these books: GoEnglish.com Pocket English Idioms by Adam Sullivan and Rita Tseng.

Scholastic Dictionary of Idioms: More Than 600 Phrases, Sayings, and Expressions by Marvin Terban

2.      As students are working, discuss idioms they are working on and ask them to explain the literal and figurative meanings.

3.      Review students' findings, fill in gaps in information, and give feedback.

4.      Reinforcement: (Independent Practice/Homework)

Have students visit the following website to become familiar with more idioms - http://www.funbrain.com/idioms/index.html

5.      Closure:  Review the definition of idiom, common expression, figure of speech.  Ask students why sayings are not mean to be taken literally.

 

Evaluation and Assessment:

  1. Evaluate students' charts for differences in literal and figurative meanings.  Check for accuracy of figurative or understood meanings.

 

Accommodations:

 

General: 

  • Shorten the length of the assignment.
  • Change the form or complexity of the response of the student by allowing the student to use the chart as a MS Word document while searching for idiom meanings.  He/she may copy and paste meanings from the internet onto the chart and type in his/her literal meanings.

 

Specific:

·         Students will be allowed and encouraged to work in pairs or groups.  (Socially and Emotionally Disturbed)

  • Directions will be presented orally, and then given in written form for students to use during the activity.  (Auditory Impaired)
  • Definitions, idioms discussed in the large group, and the chart will be displayed on the overhead as well as read aloud.  (Visually Impaired)

 

Procedure:  Day Two

 

Anticipatory Set:  Ask students to describe what they find humorous when watching television, movies, or when reading.  What situations are amusing to them?  Are there certain words that are funny?

 

Activities:

  1. Follow up:  Tell students that there are other ways to convey humor, as we see in The Phantom Tollbooth, with idioms.
  2. Modeling:  Read a mini-scene from the play, or view a clip of the videotape, that uses an idiom.  Ask students to explain the meaning of the idiom.  How did the characters react to this idiom?  What is the author's purpose here?  Students should recognize the element of humor due to the misinterpretation of the idiom.

 

Check for Understanding:

  1.  Guided Practice:  Assign groups or pairs one of the idioms from the chart created yesterday.  Using the hand out (see attached), students will revisit the mini-scene in which the idiom is used.  Then answer these two questions - How do characters react to the use of the idiom?  Why is this humorous?
  2. Each group will share what they found by reading the mini-scene aloud and answering the two questions above.
  3. Closure:  As a group discuss what is the author's purpose for using idioms?  What effect does it have on the reader?

 

Evaluation and Assessment:

  1. Collect and review hand outs completed while doing the activities.

 

Accommodations:

 

General:

  • Change the form or complexity of the response of the student.
  • Limit the number of choices or items, too many can cause confusion.

 

Specific:

  • Students will be allowed and encouraged to work in pairs or groups.  (Socially and Emotionally Disturbed)
  • Directions will be presented orally, and then given in written form for students to use during the activity.  (Auditory Impaired)
  • Partner may write on hand out for special needs student.  (Speech/Language Impaired)

 

 

 
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